Art Quote for the Day

“I notice that students often start laying in colors and paint just to cover the canvas, without being very attentive to what’s going down–colors and values all over the map! They are feeling they want to get started and hope to refine it later. The problem is, the surface of the picture plane is so alive and active that every inattentive mark you put on it is taking you away from what you had intended to paint faster than you can possibly realize . It makes a lot of sense to try and get it right the first time as if it really mattered, moving intelligently right now toward your idea. And it really helps to have an idea. But just laying in paint as an unhelpful foundation completely confounds our ability to see what we’ve accomplished and where we need to go next. Every part is now reverberating with every other in a chaotic and confusing jumble, and trying to dig ourselves out of that mess may be too much for any painter.
This brings up 2 points.First, so much of what we do while we paint is a reflection of our character and shows us, for better or worse, and if we choose to perceive it, our true nature. Not taking time to lay in a strong and meaningful foundation may be something that manifests in other areas of our life. Art can be a remarkable feedback mechanism for our life.
This is not the same as trying to get it perfect. It justs means trying to get it as right as you can as you go along. “Right” means being aligned to your idea. Trying for perfection takes the life out of expression. to be continued………..

Creative Authenticity- 16 Principles to Clarify and Deepen Your Artistic Vision by Ian Roberts

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Art Quote for the Day

So, in my efforts to explore something different….. change my technique, my style, explore other motifs and ideas, different colors, and different media, a question came to my mind.

OK….. I definitely have a kind of imagery that I feel bonded with …… for the last 16 years or so ….. I’m physiologically driven to draw and paint  imagery that contains bi-laterally balanced shapes, ( lotus, the onion domes of the Kremlin, that sort of thing). I have seen lots of other artists’ work out there that also use this sort of imagery. We , as artists, “take”, “use”, “derive”, “mimic” the work of others and , HOPEFULLY , make it our own.

I have found an artist , via the” PINTERESTS”, whose work I have fallen in love with. For many  reasons. #1 being the use , in some pieces of those same bi-laterally balanced shapes. The technique used is more free, more mixed media, simpler in some ways but more rich in surface. ANYWAY, I have been totally inspired…. and find myself trying to create imagery that reflects this artist’s work . Now, in the grand scheme of things, is this plagarism? I’m still using my own ideas, my own sensibilities…. but more in the style of this artist  in a search for a different style of my own. I’ve switched from oils for the time being  to acrylics because they seem more spontaneous to me. I don’t know if the artist I’m talking about uses acrylics or not…. most pieces are listed as mixed media.

This artist’s work is large, I’m merely experimenting on small square foot panels.

This artist has a larger vocabulary in the work , not just the bilateral shapes, and that work I don’t like as well altho’ the colors and textures in all pieces are something I’m drooling over.

I guess, at the end of the day, whether we’ve been at this business of making art for one day or one lifetime, studying and , yes, I’ll say it, copying the work of others has been standard practice. The ideal goal is to move beyond the copying and begin to find something that moves each one of us in a very personal way. This is the motivation we all need to keep making art EVERYDAY.

GOOD LUCK  in your own creative invention and re-invention wherever direction  you may find yourself heading toward.

Art Quote for the Day

12 September 1990
Accept that I can plan nothing.
Any thoughts on my part about the ‘construction’ of a picture are false, and if the execution works, this is only because I partly destroy it,or because it works in spite of everything – by not detracting and by not looking the way I planned.
I often find this intolerable and even impossible to accept, because, as a thinking, planning human being, it humiliates me to find out that I am so powerless. It casts doubt on my competence and constructive ability. My only consolation is to tell myself that I did actually make the pictures – even though they are a law unto themselves, even though they treat me any way they like and somehow just take shape. Because it’s still up to me to determine the point at which they are finished, (picture-making consists of a multitude of Yes/No decisions, with a YES to end it all). If I look at it that way, the whole thing starts to seem quite natural again – or rather Nature-like, alive- and the same thing applies to the comparison on the social level.

The Daily Practice of Painting – Gerhard Richter

Art Quote for the Day

21 July 1989
Nature/Structure. There is no more to say. In my pictures I reduce to that. But ‘reduce’ is the wrong word, because these are not simplifications. I can’t verbalize what I am working on: to me, it is many layered by definition; it is what is more important, what is more true.
Everything you can think of – the feeblemindedness, the stupid ideas, the gimcrack constructions and speculations, the amazing inventions and the glaring juxtapositions – the things you can’t help seeing a million times over, day in and day out; the impoverishment and the cocksure ineptitude – I paint all that away, out of myself, out of my head, when I first start on a picture. That is my foundation, my ground. I get rid of that in the first few layers, which I destroy, layer by layer, until all the facile feeblemindedness has gone. I end up with work of destruction. It goes without saying that I can’t take any short cuts: I can’t start off right away with the work in its final state.
The Daily Practice of Painting – Gerhard Richter

Art Quote of the Day

VARIETY

Variety is the counterweight to harmony, the other side of organization essential to unity.  Although an artist might bring a work together with harmony, it is variety that imparts individuality, arousing the viewer’s curiosity and holding his or her attention.  It creates visual contrast – a separation of elements and images.  Like a good sheepdog that singles out one animal from the flock, the introduction of variety actively separates areas or images to make them more exciting and let them stand apart.

If an artist creates a work using a complete equality of visual forces, the work may feel static, lifeless, and unemotional. Visual boredom is a sign of an overly harmonious composition.  By adding degrees of variation, the artist introduces essential ingredients ( such as diversion or change) for sustaining attention.

Visual interest, then, results directly from adding variety to the composition.  Variety causes visual separation – a pulling apart of related elements or images, differentiating and disassociating the componenets.  This separation is achieved through the use of contrast and elaboration.

Art Fundamentals – Theory and Practice by Ocvirk,Stinson,Wigg, Bone, Cayton

As a teacher of 2-dimensional design, I emphasize the fact that Variety, as one of the unifying principals of design is important to the completion of a successfully designed image. If you go to my blogsite , then follow me on Pinterest you’ll find a board that is labelled , APPLES. I have a quote that , very early on I posted as a quote of the day, dealing with this idea. It goes something like this: Art is about making choices… take a simple subject like an apple. Is it red or green? shrivelled , bruised , fresh, is it the BIG APPLE or the apple that the witch gave Snow White? The quote goes on , but eventually points out that with each decision made about that apple you change the meaning of the art. I decided to use this ideas and collect images of apples and on my Pinterest page you’ll find numerous examples. Enjoy! And for your own amusement, pick a simple object and set to creating imagery using assorted media you may have, collage, pencil, paint, makeup, finger nail polish, anything and everything will work if you keep an open mind!

Art Quote of the Day

” Composition is what’s left over after you’ve eliminated everything it’s not.  Composition is not how; the hows of painting are technique, the different ways pigments are applied to achieve different effects.  Composition is not subject matter; the identical composition can be equally effective as still life, figure, or landscape.  Composition is not drawing; otherwise, nonobjective art would not qualify as art.  Composition is not color; if it were, Rembrandt’s etchings wouldn’t be art.  What’s left?

Composition is where– simply putting the right mark and the right color in the right place.

You’ll find the secret to good composition in your kitchen drawer with your everyday silverware.  That drawer is partitioned off into a grid  that illustrates the prinicple of alignment. Knives, forks, and spoons each have their own compartment ( the principle of proximity). The drawer may hold dinner forks and salad forks; regular knives and butter knives; teaspoons, tablespoons, and soup spoons ( the principle of theme and variations).

Next to the silverware drawer there’s probably a junk drawer containing all those odds and ends that don’t seem to fit anywhere else.  Compared to your silverware drawer, it’s a mess. The junk drawer is comparable to the order found in nature.  There may be some kind of organization to it, but it’s not apparent to rational man.

Every organization is a hierarchy in which some things are more important than others. Similarly, a well-composed painting is an organization chart of its elements.  The viewer knows right away what’s important and what’s not.

Yes , a painting may look as if it were uncomposed in the same way a dance may appear spontaneous.  Watch the title dance number ,

Singing in the RainWe recognize (at least on an intuitive level) that Gene Kelly’s dancing is composed.  A work of art is always composed, and it requires considerable artifice to make it look spontaneous. ”

Conversations in Paint – A Notebook of Fundamentals by Charles Dunn

Art Quote of the Day

” I think of my creative process as a conversation.  I work on two or three paintings at once; they are all hanging on nails on a drip-stained wall in – my studio.  I generally don’t work from sketches or any preconceived ideas of what the piece will look like when it’s done. Instead, I often start by adding layers , washes, bits of paper, or writing- anything to just start the conversation.  I will keep adding layers, covering them up and trying to reveal them again.  If I feel unsure of where to go next, I sit in a chair across the room and just look at the work.  I look and I wait until I feel my intuition stir somewhere in my solar plexus.  Some people call this a ‘gut feeling.’ It’s reassuring to know there is always this internal way of knowing to have as a creative ally.”

quote by Cheryl Warrick from the book, Art From Intuition- Overcoming Your Fears and Obstacles to Making Art by Dean Wimmer

Art Quote of the Day

Martin Luther King Day- would he be happy with our progress in Civil Rights?

Inauguration Day – with President Obama being sworn in I think he would be , but still a long way to go!

Here in Wisconsin it is  minus 25 degrees !!  With a windchill added in it’s going to be even colder. This is the kind of winter day I had in mind when I made the short little video (home page,video section) of my back yard after a summer’s rain… I’m going to look at that frequently in the coming days and DREAM of warmer times!

“Every element that you add to a piece has an effect on every other element already in place.  As you work, try to see both the big picture of the overall design and the details that define its elements.  How could this new element best be added to the composition? Does this new element’s placement leave room for others yet to come? Should this item dominate or support certain others?  Should it dominate/support through size, position, color or something else?  Does it enforce the meaning and the message of the piece?  Do other elements need to be altered, repositioned, added or eliminated?

Add to the composition only those items which agreee with other elements thematically and add to the message and/or informational value.  Be prepared and willing to restructure existing elements every time a new one is added. EXPERIMENT, EXPLORE, EVALUATE.

Creative Sparks – Jim Krause

Art Quote of the Day

“Presumably, creative efforts often fail because not enough alternatives are considered. People accept the first adequate but probably mediocre solution they think of, when they could discover much better ones by persisting. Their failure could be described as a failure to search longer – to deliberately push beyond early ideas and find more options before selecting .Superior creative efforts involve deliberately searching for many alternatives.”
-D.N. Perkins – The Mind’s Best Work